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Posts Tagged ‘Book of Isaiah’

The antichrist prophecies

March 3, 2014 3 comments

The great army of Joel 2

In Joel’s prophecy, God’s people are described under the figure of a plague of locusts. [vs. 25] The locust metaphor alludes to the Israelites in the wilderness. After the Exodus, Moses commissioned representatives from each tribe to survey the land that Israel was to inherit. When they returned after 40 days some of the spies gave an evil report, describing the people dwelling in the land as giants, and themselves as grasshoppers. People who have not entered the saints’ promised land are represented in Joel’s prophecy by locusts.

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Prophecy and God’s plan

February 27, 2014 Comments off

Prophecy reveals how God’s plan is working out. When properly interpreted and understood, it explains God’s purpose, and what Christ is doing.

Jesus taught his disciples to watch, and warned that his prophecies would come to pass, while most people in the world are unaware of it. Referring to the time of his coming, when he will be revealed in his saints, he said:

“For as a snare shall it come on all them that dwell on the face of the whole earth. Watch ye therefore, and pray always, that ye may be accounted worthy to escape all these things that shall come to pass, and to stand before the Son of man.” [Luke 21:35-36]

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Enter into the rock

October 28, 2013 Comments off

“Enter into the rock,” Isaiah said.

“Enter into the rock, and hide thee in the dust, for fear of the Lord, and for the glory of his majesty.” [Isa. 2:10]

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Zion’s foundations

October 13, 2013 1 comment

Isaiah said that in Zion, God will lay a stone, a sure foundation, a precious corner stone.

Therefore thus saith the Lord God, Behold, I lay in Zion for a foundation a stone, a tried stone, a precious corner stone, a sure foundation: he that believeth shall not make haste. [Isa. 28:16]

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The desert will blossom as the rose

October 2, 2013 Comments off

Prophecies in this category apply to the church at the end of the age when the holy Spirit is poured out on the Church.

In these prophecies, the wilderness represents the Church’s spiritual environment. As the children of Israel who came out of Egypt dwelt in the wilderness en route to the promised land, the church has also been in a wilderness since the time of the apostles, according to Rev. 12:6 & 14.

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Alva J. McClain and the kingdom of Christ

September 8, 2013 2 comments

At LifeCoach4God, David P. Craig has posted an article originally written by Alva J. McClain (1888-1968), former President of Grace Theological Seminary, about the nature of the kingdom of God in the period of Acts and throughout the present age. McClain argued that Jesus is not now actually king, but that his kingdom was “an immediate possibility, depending on the attitude of the nation of Israel.” But I think McClain has misrepresented what the Scriptures teach on this subject.

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Robert McCulloch on Isa. 2:1-4

June 13, 2013 Comments off

Robert McCulloch (1740-1824), was a Minister of the Gospel at Dairsie, Scotland. He was the author of a series of lectures on the prophecies of Isaiah. In his exposition on Isaiah 2:1-4 he rejected a strictly literal approach to the prophecy, and identified ‘the mountain of the Lord’s house’ as signifying the Christian church, especially in apostolic times. The following excerpt is from ‘Lectures on the Prophecies of Isaiah,’ Volume 1 (1791)  pp. 129-142.

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Luis de León and Isaiah 2:2

June 5, 2013 1 comment

Luis de León (1527-1591) was an Augustinian friar, poet, and a Jesuit theologian. His book ‘The Names of Christ’ was written while he was imprisoned at Valladolid by the Spanish Inquisition from Mar. 1572 to Dec. 1576, while complaints by Dominican scholars about his use of the Hebrew text and the Septuagint in his lectures and writings were considered by the Inquisition. He was cleared of the charges and restored to his position.

In the paragraphs quoted below Luis discussed Isaiah’s prophecy in Isa. 2:2. He identified ‘the mountain of the Lord’s house’ with Christ. [1]

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Jack Kelley’s supernatural insight

December 6, 2012 2 comments

Lyn Leahz posted an article on Idealists, Preterists, And Futurists written by dispensationalist Jack Kelley. In the article Kelley expressed his opinions on the comments by James in Acts 15:13-18 on a prophecy found in Amos 9:11, about the tabernacle of David. James applied the prophecy to the church.

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Fairbairn on Isaiah 2:2

November 23, 2012 Comments off

Patrick Fairbairn observed, “There are many passages in the prophets in which the application to them of a strict and historical literalism would not only evacuate their proper meaning, but render them absolutely ridiculous and inconsistent one with another.”

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Revelation and elevation

July 15, 2012 Comments off

David wrote, in Psalm 36:6, “Thy righteousness is like the great mountains.” The great mountains of the earth are regions of snow and ice, that remained inaccessible to men until the nineteenth century when adventurers developed mountaineering skills, and began to discover routes to the tops of the high peaks of the European Alps, and other mountains of the world.

The reason David compared God’s righteousness to high mountains must have to do with their altitude, and their metaphorical connection with high and lofty thoughts, such as the prophet Isaiah referred to when he described God’s thoughts as higher than those of man.

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Milton S. Terry and the grammatico-historical principle

July 14, 2012 Comments off

Israel’s promised land, described as a land of milk and honey, and the seventh day sabbath, are both types of the rest that Hebrews 3-4 encourages believers to enter. Entering this rest requires belief. 

After the children of Israel were delivered from Egypt, they endured 40 years wandering in the wilderness. At the end of that period Joshua addressed them, and he spoke of their promised inheritance as rest. “Remember the word which Moses the servant of the LORD commanded you, saying, The Lord your God hath given you rest, and hath given you this land.” [Joshua 1:13]

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Weaned from the milk

July 11, 2012 1 comment

The author of Hebrews contrasts milk and strong meat. The meaning of milk, and strong meat, as symbols representing elementary and advanced kinds of spiritual knowledge, is evident from the context. The milk of God’s word includes the accounts of the lives of men of faith, and the accounts of the history of Israel, the gospel accounts of the ministry of Jesus, and the Acts of the apostles, all the events in the scriptures related in a straightforward manner.

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Why the promised land is called desolate

July 5, 2012 Comments off

Israel was promised blessings in their land, if the people kept the law. [Leviticus 26:3-5] If they abandoned the law, however, the land would no longer yield her strength to them. [Leviticus 26:18-20]

In many prophecies, the land is described as desolate. Isaiah connected the desolation of the land with understanding and believing the words of the prophets. In response to his question, how long will it be before the people of Israel understand with their heart, and convert, and become healed? Isaiah was told, “until the land be utterly desolate.”

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Many days without a king

June 2, 2012 Comments off

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In the 9th of his 15 arguments against the idea that Christ now reigns upon the throne of David, in this article, George Zeller applies a prophecy of Hosea, that Israel would “abide many days without a king” to ethnic Jews, and so concludes that Christ can not now be reigning on the throne of David. Zeller wrote:

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Dispensationalism and the eyes of our understanding

May 28, 2012 Comments off

Isaiah said the mountain of the Lord’s house would be raised up, and established in the tops of the mountains, above the hills. [Isaiah 2:2] This was fulfilled, when Jesus ascended to heaven, to the throne of God, where he reigns over all.

In a recent post on Throttling Dispensationalism? “mac” responds to my comment in this post, where I mentioned a quotation by James from Amos 9:11, in Acts 15:16. James applied a prophecy addressed to Israel to the New Testament church and identified the tabernacle of David with the church. I and many others view this scripture as a serious problem for dispensationalism. I stated: By quoting this prophecy in Acts 15, James identified the church with the tabernacle of David, which throttles dispensationalism!
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Rain and rivers in Isaiah 30:20-28

April 27, 2012 Comments off

In his commentary on Isaiah 30:20, where the English translation reads “yet shall not thy teachers be removed into a corner any more,” John Calvin translated: “Thy rain shall no longer be restrained.” Calvin viewed ‘rain’ as better suited to the immediate context in the verse itself, (‘the water of affliction’) than the word ‘teachers.’ Read more…

William Varner on whether Jesus Christ is king

April 1, 2012 2 comments

Dr. William Varner, Professor of Bible & Greek at the Master’s College, stated in his recent post Prophet-Priest-King that Jesus is a prophet, a priest, and a king. He wrote: “As the anointed one of the Lord, Jesus was, is, and always will be the Prophet, the Priest, and the King at the same time.”

Jesus is Lord and king of the saints who reign with him, and also their high priest, and the mediator of the New Covenant.

Varner also stated in his article, “Following His return to earth, during His millennial reign, His role as king will be stressed (Rev. 19:16). The point is that Jesus is always the anointed king, but He enters into His public office as king during the Millennial Kingdom.” Read more…

A way in the mountains

March 1, 2012 Comments off

Isaiah said, “And I will make all my mountains a way, and my highways shall be exalted.” [Isaiah 49:11] By various interpreters, the mountains of prophecy are said to be powerful, self-righteous and proud people, kingdoms, obstacles in a road, proud thoughts, or literal mountains. However, I suggest, the mountains of prophecy are in fact none of these, but instead, they represent God’s promises. These promises, and blessings are a way or route that believers can follow, because in his Sermon on the Mount, Jesus promised a number of blessings to those who follow him. [Matthew 5:1-11] Below are some of the reasons why the mountains represent God’s promises to believers. Read more…

Mountains made low

February 29, 2012 Comments off

Isaiah’s prophecy about making a highway in the desert is coupled with a prophecy about mountains being made low, and in many interpretations of his prophecy, the mountains are reduced to mere bumps in the road!

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