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Archive for the ‘Promised land’ Category

Andrew Jukes on the biblical types

June 6, 2014 Comments off

The following is a discussion of the typology of the Pentateuch, by Andrew Jukes.

Andrew John Jukes. The law of the offerings in Leviticus I-VII, considered as the appointed figure of the various aspects of the offering of the body of Jesus Christ. J. Nisbet and co., 1869. pp. 1-33.

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Prophecy and God’s plan

February 27, 2014 Comments off

Prophecy reveals how God’s plan is working out. When properly interpreted and understood, it explains God’s purpose, and what Christ is doing.

Jesus taught his disciples to watch, and warned that his prophecies would come to pass, while most people in the world are unaware of it. Referring to the time of his coming, when he will be revealed in his saints, he said:

“For as a snare shall it come on all them that dwell on the face of the whole earth. Watch ye therefore, and pray always, that ye may be accounted worthy to escape all these things that shall come to pass, and to stand before the Son of man.” [Luke 21:35-36]

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Gog & Magog, and Plato’s philosophy

January 27, 2014 Comments off

Ezekiel wrote of Gog and Magog:

“After many days thou shalt be visited: in the latter years thou shalt come into the land that is brought back from the sword, and is gathered out of many people, against the mountains of Israel, which have been always waste: but it is brought forth out of the nations, and they shall dwell safely all of them. Thou shalt ascend and come like a storm, thou shalt be like a cloud to cover the land, thou, and all thy bands, and many people with thee.” [Ezek. 38:8-9]

“The land brought back from the sword” seems to allude to the garden of Eden, which was guarded by an angel or a cherubim brandishing a flaming sword. [Gen. 3:24] And Eden represents the knowledge of God revealed in the Gospel and in the Scriptures.

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Horses in Ezekiel 38

January 25, 2014 1 comment

In Ezekiel’s prophecy of Gog and Magog, all the armies ride upon horses.

“Therefore, son of man, prophesy and say unto Gog, Thus saith the Lord God; In that day when my people of Israel dwelleth safely, shalt thou not know it? And thou shalt come from thy place out of the north parts, thou, and many people with thee, all of them riding upon horses, a great company, and a mighty army:” [Ezek. 38:14-15]

In prophecy, horses are symbolic of people with no understanding. David wrote: “Be ye not as the horse, or as the mule, which have no understanding: whose mouth must be held in with bit and bridle, lest they come near unto thee.” [Psa. 32:9]

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The war of Gog and Magog and the saints’ rest

January 23, 2014 Comments off

The armies of Gog and Magog in Ezekiel 38 come against “the mountains of Israel.”

“After many days thou shalt be visited: in the latter years thou shalt come into the land that is brought back from the sword, and is gathered out of many people, against the mountains of Israel, which have been always waste: but it is brought forth out of the nations, and they shall dwell safely all of them.” [Ezek. 38:8]

In Ezekiel’s prophecies, the mountains of Israel are metaphors representing God’s promises to his saints. When Jacob blessed Joseph, he said, “The blessings of thy father have prevailed above the blessings of my progenitors unto the utmost bound of the everlasting hills: they shall be on the head of Joseph, and on the crown of the head of him that was separate from his brethren.” [Gen. 49:26] God’s promises are eternal, and have a lofty spiritual meaning, so they are compared to high mountains in prophecy.

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Promises to the Church in Ezekiel 36

October 21, 2013 2 comments

Ezekiel addressed his prophecy in chapter 36 to the mountains of Israel, symbols of God’s promises, and prophecies.

Of these mountains the enemy said, ‘Aha, the ancient high places are ours in possession.’ [Ezek. 36:2]

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Hints of the better country in Ezekiel 36

October 19, 2013 2 comments

The colored text in the following quote from Hebrews 8 is from Jeremiah 31:31-34.

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Zion’s foundations

October 13, 2013 1 comment

Isaiah said that in Zion, God will lay a stone, a sure foundation, a precious corner stone.

Therefore thus saith the Lord God, Behold, I lay in Zion for a foundation a stone, a tried stone, a precious corner stone, a sure foundation: he that believeth shall not make haste. [Isa. 28:16]

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The land and its deity

July 6, 2013 Comments off

God’s promises to Abraham were connected with knowing God, as God’s revelations of himself were Abraham’s “exceeding great reward.”

“After these things the word of the Lord came unto Abram in a vision, saying, Fear not, Abram: I am thy shield, and thy exceeding great reward.” [Gen. 15:1]

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Dispensationalism and the Gog and Magog prophecies

February 12, 2013 1 comment

Beechick’s winepress

January 24, 2013 Comments off

Allan Beechick is a dispensationalist author, known for his book The Rapture Solution, in which he offered a unique but flawed interpretation of Luke 17:36-37.

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The feet of them that bring good tidings

December 12, 2012 Comments off

Isaiah wrote,

Isaiah 52:7
How beautiful upon the mountains are the feet of him that bringeth good tidings, that publisheth peace; that bringeth good tidings of good, that publisheth salvation; that saith unto Zion, Thy God reigneth!

Four things are brought together in the prophecy: good tidings, mountains, the feet of the messenger, and the fact that God reigns. The meaning of good tidings was identified by Paul, who applied the scripture to those preaching the Gospel. [Rom. 10:15-16]

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Are children of Abraham created from stones?

November 28, 2012 Comments off

John the Baptist said to the Jews, “Bring forth therefore fruits worthy of repentance, and begin not to say within yourselves, We have Abraham to our father: for I say unto you, That God is able of these stones to raise up children unto Abraham.” [Luke 3:8]

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The serpent’s flood and the better land

September 21, 2012 Comments off

Rivers bring the water from places where the rain falls, or from high snowy mountains, to places that normally receive very little rain. The prophetic rivers are metaphors. Rain represents God’s word, and the prophetic rivers are streams of God’s revelations, themes of knowledge that extend throughout the Bible. Isaiah said,

Isaiah 55:10-11
For as the rain cometh down, and the snow from heaven, and returneth not thither, but watereth the earth, and maketh it bring forth and bud, that it may give seed to the sower, and bread to the eater: So shall my word be that goeth forth out of my mouth: it shall not return unto me void, but it shall accomplish that which I please, and it shall prosper in the thing whereto I sent it.

The rivers depict themes of the gospel, and they are parables, that illustrate how God’s promises work out through the ages.

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The blessings of Israel

September 15, 2012 Comments off

The prophecy of Ezekiel chapter 34 distinguishes between the mountains of Israel, and the mountains of other lands.

Ezekiel 34:6 says, “My sheep wandered through all the mountains, and upon every high hill: yea, my flock was scattered upon all the face of the earth, and none did search or seek after them.”

God’s sheep are scattered upon the face of the earth, in tens of thousands of sects and denominations, and ministries, with many different beliefs.

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Mountains and rivers in the better land

September 12, 2012 Comments off

Isaiah said in the last days, referring to Judah and Jerusalem, that the mountain of the Lord’s house would be raised up, to the top of the mountains, and exulted above the hills.

Isaiah 2:1-2
The word that Isaiah the son of Amoz saw concerning Judah and Jerusalem.
And it shall come to pass in the last days, that the mountain of the Lord’s house shall be established in the top of the mountains, and shall be exalted above the hills; and all nations shall flow unto it.

When we compare this with Ezekiel’s prophecy about the river flowing from the house of the Lord, a paradox appears. Any tectonic event that would elevate Jerusalem in a literal sense, would increase the slope in the surrounding area. But in Ezekiel’s description, the river in the vicinity of Jerusalem is shown to have a very gentle gradient, comparable to that of a football field, where a minimal slope is needed for drainage. In about half a mile, the depth of the river increases by only about three feet. [Ezek. 47:1-7]

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The paradox of the better land

September 10, 2012 Comments off

The better land of Hebrews 11:16 is heavenly, and yet, the saints remain on the earth, which seems to be a paradox. How can people dwelling on the earth be in a better land, if it is located in heaven? Perhaps it is not located in heaven, but has a heavenly character.

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Rainfall in the better land

September 6, 2012 Comments off

The better land represents the knowledge of God, and the spiritual inheritance of the saints. As the earthly Canaan was watered by rain, the better land is watered by God’s Spirit. In many prophecies, rainfall is a metaphor representing the Spirit, which enables our minds to understand the scriptures.

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The mountains of Ezekiel 36:1-15

July 19, 2012 Comments off

Bible scholars have suggested various meanings for the mountains of Israel in Ezekiel 36:1-15. These include (1) the land; (2) the people of Israel; (3) either the land or the people; (4) they are metaphors representing God’s promises. Correctly interpreting the mountains is key to understanding the prophecy. Daniel I. Block wrote on the theological significance of this prophecy:

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Revelation and elevation

July 15, 2012 Comments off

David wrote, in Psalm 36:6, “Thy righteousness is like the great mountains.” The great mountains of the earth are regions of snow and ice, that remained inaccessible to men until the nineteenth century when adventurers developed mountaineering skills, and began to discover routes to the tops of the high peaks of the European Alps, and other mountains of the world.

The reason David compared God’s righteousness to high mountains must have to do with their altitude, and their metaphorical connection with high and lofty thoughts, such as the prophet Isaiah referred to when he described God’s thoughts as higher than those of man.

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