Archive

Archive for the ‘Mountains in prophecy’ Category

Prophecy and God’s plan

February 27, 2014 Comments off

Prophecy reveals how God’s plan is working out. When properly interpreted and understood, it explains God’s purpose, and what Christ is doing.

Jesus taught his disciples to watch, and warned that his prophecies would come to pass, while most people in the world are unaware of it. Referring to the time of his coming, when he will be revealed in his saints, he said:

“For as a snare shall it come on all them that dwell on the face of the whole earth. Watch ye therefore, and pray always, that ye may be accounted worthy to escape all these things that shall come to pass, and to stand before the Son of man.” [Luke 21:35-36]

Read more…

Prophecy and literalism

February 1, 2014 1 comment

Isaiah said that God speaks to us with “stammering lips and another tongue.”

“Whom shall he teach knowledge? and whom shall he make to understand doctrine? them that are weaned from the milk, and drawn from the breasts. For precept must be upon precept, precept upon precept; line upon line, line upon line; here a little, and there a little: For with stammering lips and another tongue will he speak to this people.” [Isa. 28:9-11]

Read more…

Promises to the Church in Ezekiel 36

October 21, 2013 2 comments

Ezekiel addressed his prophecy in chapter 36 to the mountains of Israel, symbols of God’s promises, and prophecies.

Of these mountains the enemy said, ‘Aha, the ancient high places are ours in possession.’ [Ezek. 36:2]

Read more…

An interactive 70 weeks chart

September 27, 2013 Comments off

My Interactive 70 Weeks Chart page allows construction of a colorful chart like the one below with only a few clicks of the mouse.

Read more…

Mountains in Matthew

September 12, 2013 Comments off

Matthew associated notable events in the ministry of Jesus with mountains. His references to mountains are listed in the following table.

Read more…

Robert McCulloch on Isa. 2:1-4

June 13, 2013 Comments off

Robert McCulloch (1740-1824), was a Minister of the Gospel at Dairsie, Scotland. He was the author of a series of lectures on the prophecies of Isaiah. In his exposition on Isaiah 2:1-4 he rejected a strictly literal approach to the prophecy, and identified ‘the mountain of the Lord’s house’ as signifying the Christian church, especially in apostolic times. The following excerpt is from ‘Lectures on the Prophecies of Isaiah,’ Volume 1 (1791)  pp. 129-142.

Read more…

Luis de León and Isaiah 2:2

June 5, 2013 1 comment

Luis de León (1527-1591) was an Augustinian friar, poet, and a Jesuit theologian. His book ‘The Names of Christ’ was written while he was imprisoned at Valladolid by the Spanish Inquisition from Mar. 1572 to Dec. 1576, while complaints by Dominican scholars about his use of the Hebrew text and the Septuagint in his lectures and writings were considered by the Inquisition. He was cleared of the charges and restored to his position.

In the paragraphs quoted below Luis discussed Isaiah’s prophecy in Isa. 2:2. He identified ‘the mountain of the Lord’s house’ with Christ. [1]

Read more…

Metaphorical mountains of prophecy

May 12, 2013 Comments off

The metaphorical meaning of mountains as symbols of God’s promises and blessings is based upon the words of Jacob in Genesis 49:26 where he said, as he blessed Joseph:

The blessings of thy father have prevailed above the blessings of my progenitors unto the utmost bound of the everlasting hills.

Mountains, rivers, valleys, hills, coasts, wilderness, desert, are all part of the land that God promised to give Abraham, and to Isaac, and to Jacob. Belief was required for the Israelites to enter the land of promise. [Heb. 3:19] Jacob discovered that the things that must be believed, promises of spiritual blessings, are represented by mountains and hills.

The promises he received were lofty and spiritual, and so were high like high mountains, and also durable, or eternal, so he compared them to the “everlasting hills.”

The table below lists many prophecies that refer to mountains, with brief explanatory notes.

Read more…

The resting place

December 13, 2012 Comments off

One of the symbolic meanings attached to mountains in prophecy is connected the fact that the ark rested upon the mountains of Ararat. In many prophecies the mountains are symbolic of blessings, promises, and revelations of God. The Genesis account of the flood connects mountains with rest. After the flood men tried to build “a city and a tower, whose top may reach unto heaven.” The progressive revelation of God’s plan in prophecy focuses on mountains, especially mount Zion, and a city, Jerusalem, which were raised up to heaven in a spiritual sense. These contrast with the tower of Babel, a kind of man-made mountain, and the city of Babylon. In the table below, references to mountains are listed, and the possible symbolic meanings attached to them in prophecy are noted.

Read more…

The feet of them that bring good tidings

December 12, 2012 Comments off

Isaiah wrote,

Isaiah 52:7
How beautiful upon the mountains are the feet of him that bringeth good tidings, that publisheth peace; that bringeth good tidings of good, that publisheth salvation; that saith unto Zion, Thy God reigneth!

Four things are brought together in the prophecy: good tidings, mountains, the feet of the messenger, and the fact that God reigns. The meaning of good tidings was identified by Paul, who applied the scripture to those preaching the Gospel. [Rom. 10:15-16]

Read more…

Who are Daniel’s people in Daniel 9:24?

November 27, 2012 Comments off

Dispensationalists say that the 70 weeks prophecy in Daniel 9:24-27 applies to Jews, not the church, because the prophecy says “Seventy weeks are determined upon thy people and upon thy holy city,” in Daniel 9:24.

Read more…

Fairbairn on Isaiah 2:2

November 23, 2012 Comments off

Patrick Fairbairn observed, “There are many passages in the prophets in which the application to them of a strict and historical literalism would not only evacuate their proper meaning, but render them absolutely ridiculous and inconsistent one with another.”

Read more…

The blessings of Israel

September 15, 2012 Comments off

The prophecy of Ezekiel chapter 34 distinguishes between the mountains of Israel, and the mountains of other lands.

Ezekiel 34:6 says, “My sheep wandered through all the mountains, and upon every high hill: yea, my flock was scattered upon all the face of the earth, and none did search or seek after them.”

God’s sheep are scattered upon the face of the earth, in tens of thousands of sects and denominations, and ministries, with many different beliefs.

Read more…

Mountains and rivers in the better land

September 12, 2012 Comments off

Isaiah said in the last days, referring to Judah and Jerusalem, that the mountain of the Lord’s house would be raised up, to the top of the mountains, and exulted above the hills.

Isaiah 2:1-2
The word that Isaiah the son of Amoz saw concerning Judah and Jerusalem.
And it shall come to pass in the last days, that the mountain of the Lord’s house shall be established in the top of the mountains, and shall be exalted above the hills; and all nations shall flow unto it.

When we compare this with Ezekiel’s prophecy about the river flowing from the house of the Lord, a paradox appears. Any tectonic event that would elevate Jerusalem in a literal sense, would increase the slope in the surrounding area. But in Ezekiel’s description, the river in the vicinity of Jerusalem is shown to have a very gentle gradient, comparable to that of a football field, where a minimal slope is needed for drainage. In about half a mile, the depth of the river increases by only about three feet. [Ezek. 47:1-7]

Read more…

The mountains of Ezekiel 36:1-15

July 19, 2012 Comments off

Bible scholars have suggested various meanings for the mountains of Israel in Ezekiel 36:1-15. These include (1) the land; (2) the people of Israel; (3) either the land or the people; (4) they are metaphors representing God’s promises. Correctly interpreting the mountains is key to understanding the prophecy. Daniel I. Block wrote on the theological significance of this prophecy:

Read more…

On the timeframe of the Olivet Discourse

July 18, 2012 Comments off

When the disciples asked Jesus, “what shall be the sign of thy coming, and of the end of the world?” in Matthew 24, his immediate response was to list a series of events to set the scene, and to indicate both the scope, and the timeframe for events that he subsequently described. Events mentioned at the beginning of the prophecy, in verse 4-14, are listed in clear, unambiguous language, in contrast to events mentioned after verse 14 which are expressed in symbolic, prophetic terms.
Read more…

Revelation and elevation

July 15, 2012 Comments off

David wrote, in Psalm 36:6, “Thy righteousness is like the great mountains.” The great mountains of the earth are regions of snow and ice, that remained inaccessible to men until the nineteenth century when adventurers developed mountaineering skills, and began to discover routes to the tops of the high peaks of the European Alps, and other mountains of the world.

The reason David compared God’s righteousness to high mountains must have to do with their altitude, and their metaphorical connection with high and lofty thoughts, such as the prophet Isaiah referred to when he described God’s thoughts as higher than those of man.

Read more…

Prophetic mountains and time

July 7, 2012 1 comment

How prophetic mountains are perceived

Commentators have long claimed that mountains in prophecy represent nations or kingdoms, and it is true that God’s kingdom is often represented by a mountain. However, scripture supports a more fundamental interpretation of the mountains; they represent God’s blessings, and covenants, and promises.

Natural mountains may appear differently, when viewed from various directions, and prophecy is similar. Promises of blessing, and covenants, may be represented by mountains, which are prominent parts of the promised land. The kingdom of God is a prophecy, and a promise of blessing, and so it can be represented by a mountain.

Read more…

Flee to which mountains?

July 3, 2012 5 comments

The antichrist spirit, and apostasy becoming dominant in the church, are described in Daniel’s prophecies. The reign of Antiochus IV, the Seleucid king of Syria in the 2nd century BC, was typical of events of a spiritual nature, not a repetition of events of the same kind. Because of his policies, the temple at Jerusalem was made desolate, and dedicated to Zeus, which was typical of the desolation of the true temple, which is the church. Daniel referred to this desolation as the abomination of desolation. In Daniel 7 it is represented by the little horn that emerged among the ten horns of the fourth beast. In chapter 8, a king of fierce countenance who “understands dark sentences” destroys many of the holy people.

Read more…

Bruce Hurt on the mountains of Israel

July 1, 2012 Comments off

In his Ezekiel 36 Commentary, Bruce Hurt quoted from the works of numerous authors who support dispensationalism. However the author identified himself as a literalist rather that a dispensationalist. In his comments on verse 1 he wrote:

Read more…