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The antichrist prophecies

March 3, 2014 3 comments

The great army of Joel 2

In Joel’s prophecy, God’s people are described under the figure of a plague of locusts. [vs. 25] The locust metaphor alludes to the Israelites in the wilderness. After the Exodus, Moses commissioned representatives from each tribe to survey the land that Israel was to inherit. When they returned after 40 days some of the spies gave an evil report, describing the people dwelling in the land as giants, and themselves as grasshoppers. People who have not entered the saints’ promised land are represented in Joel’s prophecy by locusts.

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Gog & Magog, and Plato’s philosophy

January 27, 2014 Comments off

Ezekiel wrote of Gog and Magog:

“After many days thou shalt be visited: in the latter years thou shalt come into the land that is brought back from the sword, and is gathered out of many people, against the mountains of Israel, which have been always waste: but it is brought forth out of the nations, and they shall dwell safely all of them. Thou shalt ascend and come like a storm, thou shalt be like a cloud to cover the land, thou, and all thy bands, and many people with thee.” [Ezek. 38:8-9]

“The land brought back from the sword” seems to allude to the garden of Eden, which was guarded by an angel or a cherubim brandishing a flaming sword. [Gen. 3:24] And Eden represents the knowledge of God revealed in the Gospel and in the Scriptures.

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Horses in Ezekiel 38

January 25, 2014 1 comment

In Ezekiel’s prophecy of Gog and Magog, all the armies ride upon horses.

“Therefore, son of man, prophesy and say unto Gog, Thus saith the Lord God; In that day when my people of Israel dwelleth safely, shalt thou not know it? And thou shalt come from thy place out of the north parts, thou, and many people with thee, all of them riding upon horses, a great company, and a mighty army:” [Ezek. 38:14-15]

In prophecy, horses are symbolic of people with no understanding. David wrote: “Be ye not as the horse, or as the mule, which have no understanding: whose mouth must be held in with bit and bridle, lest they come near unto thee.” [Psa. 32:9]

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The war of Gog and Magog and the saints’ rest

January 23, 2014 Comments off

The armies of Gog and Magog in Ezekiel 38 come against “the mountains of Israel.”

“After many days thou shalt be visited: in the latter years thou shalt come into the land that is brought back from the sword, and is gathered out of many people, against the mountains of Israel, which have been always waste: but it is brought forth out of the nations, and they shall dwell safely all of them.” [Ezek. 38:8]

In Ezekiel’s prophecies, the mountains of Israel are metaphors representing God’s promises to his saints. When Jacob blessed Joseph, he said, “The blessings of thy father have prevailed above the blessings of my progenitors unto the utmost bound of the everlasting hills: they shall be on the head of Joseph, and on the crown of the head of him that was separate from his brethren.” [Gen. 49:26] God’s promises are eternal, and have a lofty spiritual meaning, so they are compared to high mountains in prophecy.

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Patrick Fairbairn on Gog and Magog

January 18, 2014 Comments off

The following is a discussion of the significance of the Gog and Magog invasion by Patrick Fairbairn (1805-1874), from his book: Ezekiel and the book of his prophecy: an exposition. Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark  (1855), pp. 421-428.

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Gog and Magog and the camp of the saints

January 15, 2014 Comments off

Dispensational attempts to interpret Ezekiel’s prophecy of the Gog & Magog invasion are a huge embarrassment; for example, the weapons of the invaders, bows and arrows, clubs, spears, javelins, swords, shields, bucklers, etc., are archaic. They are made of wood, that is later burned by Israel for fuel, so they no longer need to collect any firewood for 7 years.

The invaders all ride horses, which are very vulnerable to modern weapons such as firearms, bombs, machine guns, etc. There are also logistical problems feeding large herds of horses in regions where fresh water and grass is scarce. And horse populations are quite limited in modern times.

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Promises to the Church in Ezekiel 36

October 21, 2013 2 comments

Ezekiel addressed his prophecy in chapter 36 to the mountains of Israel, symbols of God’s promises, and prophecies.

Of these mountains the enemy said, ‘Aha, the ancient high places are ours in possession.’ [Ezek. 36:2]

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Hints of the better country in Ezekiel 36

October 19, 2013 2 comments

The colored text in the following quote from Hebrews 8 is from Jeremiah 31:31-34.

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How the world learns of God

October 1, 2013 Comments off

The prophet Ezekiel mentioned several events that would cause the heathen to learn about God. These events are connected with prophecies about the restoration of Israel. The New Testament identifies the Christian Church as Israel and Abraham’s seed. Those who believe in Christ inherit the promises of God. [Eph 2:11-13, Phil.3:3] In Acts 3:23, the apostle Peter quoted from the law of Moses, and showed that those of Israel who reject Jesus as their promised Messiah will be destroyed from among the people. [Acts 3:23] Thus, unbelieving Jews have been cut off from Israel, while Christians of all nations have become the true Israel of God.

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Links to OT prophecies in Peter’s sermon in Acts 2

August 11, 2013 1 comment

At Post Tenebras Lux Andrew G discussed Acts 2:17, where the apostle Peter, while addressing the Jews at Jerusalem on the day of Pentecost, quoted from a prophecy of Joel, beginning his quotation using the words of Isaiah rather than those of Joel.

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Dispensationalism and the Gog and Magog prophecies

February 12, 2013 1 comment

Does dispensationalism deny Jesus is the Christ?

February 7, 2013 Comments off

E. W. Hengstenberg and the perpetual throne of David

December 1, 2012 1 comment

The claims of dispensationalists, who say that prophecy should be viewed as literal, are discredited by the history of the throne of David. Although the promise to David through Nathan the prophet said, “And thine house and thy kingdom shall be established for ever before thee: thy throne shall be established for ever,” [2 Sam. 7:16] after a few centuries, the line of kings of the dynasty of David ceased, and his throne disappeared.

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The Temple-River

September 20, 2012 Comments off

The Temple-River of Ezekiel 47:1-12 implies that there is a land through which it flows, and which is healed because of it. What land is it? Not the literal territory of Canaan. It may be the better land mentioned in Hebrews 11:16.

The story of Moses striking the rock in the wilderness which brought forth water has a profound significance, and the theme of water and rivers as symbols of the Spirit flows like a river throughout both the Old and New Testaments. The Jerusalem temple was built above the site of a spring, called Gihon, which was also the name of one of the rivers in Eden. Solomon was crowned king there. [1 Kings 1:32-35]

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The blessings of Israel

September 15, 2012 Comments off

The prophecy of Ezekiel chapter 34 distinguishes between the mountains of Israel, and the mountains of other lands.

Ezekiel 34:6 says, “My sheep wandered through all the mountains, and upon every high hill: yea, my flock was scattered upon all the face of the earth, and none did search or seek after them.”

God’s sheep are scattered upon the face of the earth, in tens of thousands of sects and denominations, and ministries, with many different beliefs.

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Cosmology and Ezekiel’s throne vision

September 14, 2012 Comments off

In his commentary on Ezekiel, George Currey (1816-1885) discussed the relationship between Ezekiel and the Apocalypse of John, and he pointed out some striking differences.

One of the ways the accounts differ is in their respective descriptions of God’s throne. Currey notes some differences between the accounts in the  following paragraph. [1]

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Mountains and rivers in the better land

September 12, 2012 Comments off

Isaiah said in the last days, referring to Judah and Jerusalem, that the mountain of the Lord’s house would be raised up, to the top of the mountains, and exulted above the hills.

Isaiah 2:1-2
The word that Isaiah the son of Amoz saw concerning Judah and Jerusalem.
And it shall come to pass in the last days, that the mountain of the Lord’s house shall be established in the top of the mountains, and shall be exalted above the hills; and all nations shall flow unto it.

When we compare this with Ezekiel’s prophecy about the river flowing from the house of the Lord, a paradox appears. Any tectonic event that would elevate Jerusalem in a literal sense, would increase the slope in the surrounding area. But in Ezekiel’s description, the river in the vicinity of Jerusalem is shown to have a very gentle gradient, comparable to that of a football field, where a minimal slope is needed for drainage. In about half a mile, the depth of the river increases by only about three feet. [Ezek. 47:1-7]

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The mountains of Ezekiel 36:1-15

July 19, 2012 Comments off

Bible scholars have suggested various meanings for the mountains of Israel in Ezekiel 36:1-15. These include (1) the land; (2) the people of Israel; (3) either the land or the people; (4) they are metaphors representing God’s promises. Correctly interpreting the mountains is key to understanding the prophecy. Daniel I. Block wrote on the theological significance of this prophecy:

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Revelation and elevation

July 15, 2012 Comments off

David wrote, in Psalm 36:6, “Thy righteousness is like the great mountains.” The great mountains of the earth are regions of snow and ice, that remained inaccessible to men until the nineteenth century when adventurers developed mountaineering skills, and began to discover routes to the tops of the high peaks of the European Alps, and other mountains of the world.

The reason David compared God’s righteousness to high mountains must have to do with their altitude, and their metaphorical connection with high and lofty thoughts, such as the prophet Isaiah referred to when he described God’s thoughts as higher than those of man.

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Why the promised land is called desolate

July 5, 2012 Comments off

Israel was promised blessings in their land, if the people kept the law. [Leviticus 26:3-5] If they abandoned the law, however, the land would no longer yield her strength to them. [Leviticus 26:18-20]

In many prophecies, the land is described as desolate. Isaiah connected the desolation of the land with understanding and believing the words of the prophets. In response to his question, how long will it be before the people of Israel understand with their heart, and convert, and become healed? Isaiah was told, “until the land be utterly desolate.”

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